Certified Holistic Health Care
Accredited Therapeutic Herbalist
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Cranio Sacral Therapy
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"Let the beauty we love be what we do." Rumi

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Imagine times when we feel totally at home in our bodies, vibrant, alive and deeply connected with the vital life force around us.

Andrée Beauchamp is a Certified Holistic Health Care Practitioner & Accredited Therapeutic Herbalist, C.N.H.P, H.T.A. who specializes in Prevention with Nutritional Guidance & Herbal Medicine, Body Therapy & Energy Medicine.

To see what Andrée can do for you, schedule an appointment with her today.

Recent Blog Posts

By Andree Beauchamp 29 Dec, 2016

Sweet Hawthorn has mend more souls since the days of Adam. The bush grows a mere five feet tall and is found in abandoned fields and healing places. Hawthorn has a use for every season; as food, medicine or wildlife habitat, it keeps us warm in the winter months as its hard, dense wood burns hot without being too smoky.

The Latin name, Crataegus, comes from the Greek word for strong. Whilst this is thought to reflect the qualities of the wood, it may actually refer to the nature of the tree itself; resilient, hardy and above all abundant and unfailingly generous.

The hawthorn bush, both leaf and berry provide a deeply healing medicine for the heart. The leaf drunk as a tea soothes the most sorrowful of hearts, from loss or grief, the hawthorn who finds her way into your heart will bring you ease.

Lucinda of Whispering Earth speaks of Hawthorn as a fascinating medicinal because it’s one of the few recognized Western herbal adaptagens,  loosely meaning it helps to bring the body into balance, irrespective of whether it is over or under functioning. Widely used as a heart tonic it can help stabilize both high and low blood pressure and will benefit almost any problem that affects the heart or circulatory system, from high cholesterol to chilblains. It helps to dilate coronary arteries, improving circulation and bringing relief from angina. It also increases the heart’s ability to pump blood effectively by improving the contractility of the muscle. High levels of antioxidants protect the capillaries.

The hawthorn berries are also a Super food. They are “rich” in digest enzymes and overtime will improve and strengthen weak digestive chi.


By Andree Beauchamp 29 Dec, 2016

The Beauty of Tilia

Linden Blossoms~ Tilia Cordata

Linden, linden heal my heart
that i may know a brand new start.
Birds a tweet and bee’s a buzz
Linden blossoms sure smell sweet..                                                                                                

I hear fairies at my door
sitting under the linden tree….

The Europeans drink the linden blossoms winter long to prevent colds and flues. Susun Weed and Robin Rose Bennett shared Herbs for Resiliency last evening in a wonderful webinar. Susan’s first choice for an herb with resiliency was Linden- for its anti inflammatory properties. Inflammation creates rigidity. Linden blossoms when drunk as a herbal infusion create flexibility. Linden improves blood flow and supply to the brain, increases circulation, lowers blood pressure, reduces arteriosclerosis, and soothes one with Acid reflux.  Linden blossoms is said to mend a broken heart.
Can you not smell how sweet the blossoms are, right now brewing on the stove.
Take 30 gms of linden blossoms to a liter of boiled water.
Let this sit a minimum of four hours (left overnight best) Strain and drink the linden blossom infusion day long to keep you warm & nourished & resilient.  Linden can be infused twice. Available through the Dharani Healing Arts Herbal Dispensary.

metta, dharani

By Andree Beauchamp 24 Oct, 2016
Juniper Berries are a potent ally especially this time of the year when it is cold and damp. They add warmth and vigor to a soup base, delight in a mulled spice recipe or simply stashed in your pocket when you are out for a winter’s walk. They keep you warm by stimulating your circulation and can relieve muscle aches and pains. Juniper berries help to remove fluid congestion, reduce edema, drain damp and dissolve deposits of any kind. The juniper berry also suits those with digestive woes by stimulating and warming the middle to reduce fullness and feelings of indigestion. Throw a few in your soup to add warmth and increase your metabolism. As Juniper’s are high in volatile oils and warming, be cautious when using. They may heat things up too much.
By Andree Beauchamp 18 Oct, 2016

Elecampane grows in the meadows and along the road sides of our Ontario woodlands. Look for them along the John Counter Blvd. The plant at first glance looks like a sunchoke. Elecampane has a similar daisy like flower disk that spands 3-5inch across. With its stout and erect stem, the flowers appear in the mid of summer. The plant can reach as high as 10 feet. The leaves are large and oval shaped like a lung, with softly pointed tips up to 28 inches long, and when you look closely the leaves clutch the stalk. This is the best way to identify her.

Peter Holmes in the Energetic of Western Herbs speaks of Elecampane with its' bitter pungent properties as alterative, (blood clearing) with excellent expectorant properties and strengthening for the immune and digestive system.  Elecampane's medicine has always been touted for the respiratory system for bronchitis, asthmatic conditions and irritant coughs. The roots high Inulin content makes elecampane a wonderful medicine for spleen deficient, digestive imbalances where cold presides, with excess mucous; with bloating indigestion, lethargy and as the Chinese may say  a “cluttered mind.” Elecampane’s immuno-modulating properties helps to regulate those with hypoglycemia- not unlike Elecampane ‘s companion plant, great burdock. They both belong to the Asteraceae family.  

Elecampane ‘s root historically was enjoyed candied or drank as a cordial and the constituent  is an ingredient in Absinthe. Harvest cut chop the root and soak it in honey for an excellent digestive and cough remedy. We will make these when we go for  on our Annual walk this year as well as gather White pines for vinegar & Rosehips.


Please join us Saturday the  29th   of October – 10 to 1 pm for our Annual Herbal Walk.  See below for details.

Stay warm, dharani

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